Cheesy Grits

This is one of my favorite grits recipes:

Cheesy Grits

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup coarse ground cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 ounces sharp Cheddar, shredded or as much as you like; I use more

Instructions

Place the milk, water, and salt into a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Once the milk mixture comes to a boil, gradually add the cornmeal while continually whisking. Once all of the cornmeal has been incorporated, decrease the heat to low and cover. Remove lid and whisk frequently, every 3 to 4 minutes, to prevent grits from sticking or forming lumps; make sure to get into corners of pot when whisking. Cook for 20 to 25 minutes or until mixture is creamy.

Remove from the heat, add the pepper and butter, and whisk to combine. Once the butter is melted, gradually whisk in the cheese a little at a time. Serve immediately.

cheesy grits

Kentucky Derby

The Kentucky Derby is May 6, 2017.  With that, I thought I would add the song that makes me cry every time I hear it yet brings great pride to me.  I love “MY OLD KENTUCKY HOME” and miss it everyday!

In the world of sports, there is not a more moving moment than when the horses step onto the track for the Kentucky Derby post parade and the band strikes up “My Old Kentucky Home” and 160,000+ people sing along.

Although there is no definitive history on the playing of the Stephen Foster ballad as a Derby Day tradition, it is believed to have originated in 1921 for the 47th running. The Louisville Courier-Journal in its May 8, 1921, edition reported, “To the strains of ‘My Old Kentucky Home,’ Kentuckians gave vent their delight. For Kentucky triumphed in the Derby.” The story refers to the popular victory of the Kentucky-owned and bred Behave Yourself.

“My Old Kentucky Home,” by Stephen Foster — Lyrics

The sun shines bright in the old Kentucky home,
Tis summer, the people are gay;
The corn-top’s ripe and the meadow’s in the bloom
While the birds make music all the day. The young folks roll on the little cabin floor
All merry, all happy and bright;
By’n by hard times comes a knocking at the door
Then my old Kentucky home, Good-night! Weep no more my lady. Oh! Weep no more today!
We will sing one song for my old Kentucky home
For the old Kentucky home, far away.

Cheddar Stuffed Pimento Cheese Sausage Bites

Made this last week and they are awesome!!

INGREDIENTS

1 tube (3/4 pound) bulk pork breakfast sausage, mild or spicy
1/3 cup green onions, thinly sliced
1/3 cup panko bread crumbs
1/4 cup Wisconsin pimento cheese spread
1 large egg
1 cup (4 ounces) Wisconsin sharp cheddar cheese, cut into 12 cubes (1/2 inch each)
Parsley leaves for topping, chopped

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Heat over to 400 degrees.  Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil and coat with cooking spray.  In a large bowl, combine all ingredients except the cheddar cheese and parsley.  Mix well and divide into 12 pieces.  Wrap piece around a cheese cube and place on pan.  Bake 16 – 18 minutes or until browned and cooked through.  Place on serving tray and sprinkle with parsley.  Better served warm.

cheddar stuffed sausage balls

Persimmon Trees

One of my best memories growing up was going on hikes near our home in the hills of Kentucky (Siloam Bottoms near the Newberry Estate) and picking persimmons to eat along the way.

The Persimmon is native throughout Kentucky in dry woodland settings. The fruit is an important wildlife food and is edible.  The fruit is edible, but it is not ripe until the skin is wrinkled. Ripe persimmons are said to taste a great deal like dates. They are used to make cakes, puddings and beverages. Native Americans used the fruits to make bread, and also dried them. Fruit is an important wildlife food. However, the fruit can present a litter problem in the landscape. It is slimy, so when used in the city the tree should be planted where fruit will not fall on sidewalks, where it can cause people to fall. The plant is dioecious, so a male (fruitless) tree would be a much more acceptable landscape plant than the female.

Immature fruits contain a large amount of tannin and are astringent. They have been used to make tea for use in gargling for sore throats. The tea was also used to treat warts, cancers, heartburn, diarrhea and stomach aches.

Cooking oil, with a flavor like that of peanut oil, can be extracted from the seeds. Confederate soldiers boiled persimmon seeds as a coffee substitute during the Civil War.

Persimmon wood is very hard and nearly black. It is used to make golf club heads, billiard cues and parquet flooring.

persimmon

 

information source:  www.uky.edu 

Southwestern Hot Dogs

This recipe is from my brother-in-law, Rick:

southwest hot dogs

Southwestern Hot Dogs

Ingredients:

1 cup finely shredded cheddar cheese

3 tbsp. salsa

1/2 tsp. chili powder

10 buns

2 green onions, thinly sliced

2 tbsp. mayonnaise

10 hot dogs

Instructions:

In a bowl, combine all ingredients except dogs and buns.  Cut a 1/2″ deep lengthwise slit in each hot dog.  Spoon 2 tablespoons of mixture into each hot dog.  Broil in oven for 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.  Serve on buns.

Mango Green Tea Smoothie

Mango Green Tea Smoothie

INGREDIENTS:
2 bags of Lipton® Pure Green Tea – use 1 1/2 cups for this recipe
3 mint leaves
3/4 cup of mango
2 cups of spinach
Juice of 1/2 lime
Crushed ice
INSTRUCTIONS
Steep 2 Lipton® Pure Green Tea bags for 5 minutes in 1.5 cups of water, then let cool.  Add 1.5 cups of cooled Lipton® Pure Green Tea to a blender, then add mint mango, spinach, lime, and crushed ice.  Blend all ingredients together until you achieve a thin liquid consistency.
Mango Green Tea Smoothie