History of Mother’s Day

According to the History Channel:

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day most commonly falls on the second Sunday in May and traditionally involves presenting mothers with flowers, cards and other gifts.

To all the Mother’s out there, Happy Mother’s Day.  I hope you enjoy your day.

And to my Mom, love you to the moon and back.  Thank you for all you have done for me and teaching me to be the woman that I am today.

Cinco de Mayo

According to the History Channel: Cinco de Mayo—or the fifth of May—is a holiday that celebrates the date of the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War (1861-1867). A relatively minor holiday in Mexico, in the United States Cinco de Mayo has evolved into a commemoration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with large Mexican-American populations.

According to Time Magazine:  For many Americans, Cinco de Mayo means enjoying Mexican food and probably a few margaritas. But Cinco de Mayo, which means May 5 in Spanish, is probably one of the most misunderstood Mexican holidays.  Contrary to popular belief, Cinco de Mayo is not Mexico’s independence day.  Mexican independence is celebrated Sept.16.  Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican army’s unlikely victory over the French forces of Napoleon III on May 5, 1862, at the Battle of Puebla.  Mexico had trouble paying back war debts to European countries, and France had come to Mexico to collect that debt.  Today, Cinco de Mayo has become more of an American holiday than a Mexican one. But most non-Mexican Americans have “no idea” about the day’s history, said Carlos Tortolero, president of the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago.

In honor of Cinco de May, I thought I would share a recipe with you:

Frozen Margarita Pie

INGREDIENTS:

Crust:  1 cup finely crushed pretzels, 1/4 cup white sugar, 1/3 cup margarine, melted

Filling:

1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk

1/3 cup frozen limeade concentrate, thawed

2 tablespoons tequila, use a good tequila…better flavor

1 tablespoon orange liqueur

3 drops green food coloring, or as needed (optional)

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1 lime, sliced (optional)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
  2. Mix pretzels and sugar together in a bowl; stir in margarine until evenly incorporated. Spoon mixture into a 9-inch pie plate; press into bottom and up sides of plate to form a firm, even crust.
  3. Bake crust in the preheated oven until edges are lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.
  4. Mix sweetened condensed milk, limeade concentrate, tequila, orange liqueur, and green food coloring in a large bowl.
  5. Beat cream in a glass or metal bowl until soft peaks form. Lift your beater or whisk straight up: the whipped cream will form soft mounds rather than a sharp peak. Fold whipped cream into sweetened condensed milk mixture. Spoon filling into cooled crust.
  6. Cover pie with plastic wrap and freeze until firm, about 4 hours. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving; garnish with lime slices.

frozen margarita pie

Persimmon Trees

One of my best memories growing up was going on hikes near our home in the hills of Kentucky (Siloam Bottoms near the Newberry Estate) and picking persimmons to eat along the way.

The Persimmon is native throughout Kentucky in dry woodland settings. The fruit is an important wildlife food and is edible.  The fruit is edible, but it is not ripe until the skin is wrinkled. Ripe persimmons are said to taste a great deal like dates. They are used to make cakes, puddings and beverages. Native Americans used the fruits to make bread, and also dried them. Fruit is an important wildlife food. However, the fruit can present a litter problem in the landscape. It is slimy, so when used in the city the tree should be planted where fruit will not fall on sidewalks, where it can cause people to fall. The plant is dioecious, so a male (fruitless) tree would be a much more acceptable landscape plant than the female.

Immature fruits contain a large amount of tannin and are astringent. They have been used to make tea for use in gargling for sore throats. The tea was also used to treat warts, cancers, heartburn, diarrhea and stomach aches.

Cooking oil, with a flavor like that of peanut oil, can be extracted from the seeds. Confederate soldiers boiled persimmon seeds as a coffee substitute during the Civil War.

Persimmon wood is very hard and nearly black. It is used to make golf club heads, billiard cues and parquet flooring.

persimmon

 

information source:  www.uky.edu