Persimmon Trees

One of my best memories growing up was going on hikes near our home in the hills of Kentucky (Siloam Bottoms near the Newberry Estate) and picking persimmons to eat along the way.

The Persimmon is native throughout Kentucky in dry woodland settings. The fruit is an important wildlife food and is edible.  The fruit is edible, but it is not ripe until the skin is wrinkled. Ripe persimmons are said to taste a great deal like dates. They are used to make cakes, puddings and beverages. Native Americans used the fruits to make bread, and also dried them. Fruit is an important wildlife food. However, the fruit can present a litter problem in the landscape. It is slimy, so when used in the city the tree should be planted where fruit will not fall on sidewalks, where it can cause people to fall. The plant is dioecious, so a male (fruitless) tree would be a much more acceptable landscape plant than the female.

Immature fruits contain a large amount of tannin and are astringent. They have been used to make tea for use in gargling for sore throats. The tea was also used to treat warts, cancers, heartburn, diarrhea and stomach aches.

Cooking oil, with a flavor like that of peanut oil, can be extracted from the seeds. Confederate soldiers boiled persimmon seeds as a coffee substitute during the Civil War.

Persimmon wood is very hard and nearly black. It is used to make golf club heads, billiard cues and parquet flooring.

persimmon

 

information source:  www.uky.edu 

Author: Rhonda Faye

My name is Rhonda. I’m a Mom, wife, philanthropist, hard working, God loving Southern woman that lives in the Midwest (Wisconsin) but grew up in Kentucky. I’m obsessed with sweet tea, desserts, butter, brats and casseroles. Mama taught us how to be a lady but Daddy showed us how to shoot a gun. Hang on we are fixin’ to have some fun.

One thought on “Persimmon Trees”

  1. My first experience with persimmons was awful. It was so chalky and it dried out my mouth big time. But, I am a firm believer of giving things a second chance so, the second time I had it the experience was so much better. I’d eat them more often but they are hard to find.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s